What / is / your / question? What / do / you / want / to know? How / would / you / like / it pronounced?

Q & A

Questions are the keys to conversation. It’s a tricky area due to the use of auxiliaries in English. We usually structure the question in English in the following way;

Question word / Auxiliary / Subject / Verb / Object or Complement

The person speaking in the clip has a standard south of England accent, well, that which you’d come across in and around the Greater London area anyway. Pay particular attention to the pronunciation (or non-pronunciation) of the ‘r’ after vowel sounds. You can see from the dictionary links with phonetics that the American dictionary includes the /r/ sound yet the British version includes it as an option (r). I’ve marked some examples under the video itself. You can check those against US pronunciation of the same word.

Click on the ‘pronunciation’ button beside the phonetic text when the dictionary opens.

Ever wondered (have / you / ever wondered) where a question might take you? UK /ˈwʌndə/ – US /ˈwʌndər/

Why / do / cats / purr? UK /pəː/ – US \ˈpər\

How / can / we / turn / garbage into energy? – UK /ˈɡɑː(r)bɪdʒ/ – US /ˈɡɑrbɪdʒ/

___ / Can / robots / change / their mind? – UK /ðeə(r)/– US – /ðer/

Explore the impossible. UK /ɪkˈsplɔː(r)/ – US – /ɪkˈsplɔr/

The moon was once a pie in the sky.

You have the power (UK /ˈpaʊə(r)/) – US (/ˈpaʊər/) to change things for the better (UK /ˈbetə(r)/ – US /ˈbetər/)

To find the answer – UK /ˈɑːnsə(r)/ – US /ˈænsər/

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